On Veterans Day and every day, Red Cross helps active-duty military, veterans and families cope

By Eilene E. Guy, American Red Cross volunteer

Today is Veterans Day, when we honor those who have served in our military. But tomorrow and every day after this national holiday passes, the American Red Cross will continue to honor and support veterans, military members and their families. For more than 100 years, the Red Cross has been helping active-duty men and women in uniform, their families and veterans deal with the unique challenges of military service.

It’s no secret that military life is stressful. Those of us in civilian life can only imagine the toll it takes to be in combat or challenged with heavy responsibilities, leaving and reuniting with family and home, being uprooted, adjusting to assignment after assignment.

Red Cross Service to the Armed Forces has a whole catalogue of programs to ease those burdens – everything from a reassuring presence on battlefields, deployment stations and military hospitals across the globe to reunification and readjustment workshops here on the home front.

There are even Red Cross programs designed specifically for children who have to deal with the unique social and emotional challenges of military life.

Northern Ohio Region Red Cross volunteer Tom Adams of Cleveland uses his education, training and skills as a clinical social worker to facilitate free, confidential resiliency
workshops on bases around the country. He recently returned from Texas, where he has done sessions at Fort Bliss, Fort Hood and Fort Tyler. Some of the highlights of his assignments over more than a dozen years include assisting service members at Fort Pickett in Virginia, Orlando, Fla. and Wright-Patterson here in Ohio.

Tom sees genuine gratitude in the people he works with. Explaining why he volunteers he said, “I can give up a weekend without pay to give them a thumbnail sketch of how to handle what life throws at them. I find it really humbling to be able to do this.”

Tom structures his small-group workshops as conversations, encouraging participants to share the challenges they face in a safe space. “Then I suggest options for handling these situations,” Tom said. “I’m not there to ‘teach.’ My goal is to give them tools they can use, when they need them.”

Here in northern Ohio, the Red Cross is also active with National Guard and Reserve units, conducting workshops to help ease the transitions of deployment and reconnection after active duty.

Jessica Tischler, regional director of Service to the Armed Forces for the Northern Ohio Red Cross recruits and trains volunteers with certification in mental health and social work fields for that program.

“I have the privilege of interacting with veterans every day and hearing their stories of service and sacrifice,” she said. “It’s gratifying every Veterans Day to see the American public come together as a community to thank the men and women who served our country.”

The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the public. Our support for the U.S. military dates back to World War I, and we’re proud to maintain our founders’ commitment to the men and women who have served or continue to serve.

For more information or to volunteer or donate to support the Red Cross mission of helping active and retired military members, visit redcross.org or our Spanish site, CruzRojaAmericana.org, or follow us on Twitter at @RedCross.

Edited by Glenda Bogar, American Red Cross volunteer

Posted by Ryan Lang, American Red Cross board member and volunteer

Mike’s 2022 Veterans Day message

By Mike Parks, RADM, U.S. Coast Guard (Ret.), CEO, American Red Cross Northern Ohio Region

November 9, 2022 – Family and Friends of the Red Cross of Northern Ohio – greetings as we prepare this week to honor our nation’s Veterans on Friday, November 11th.  We do so in commemoration of World War I’s Armistice which was signed on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918.   Today there are approximately 18.5 million living Veterans in the United States.  Of the 16 plus million people who served in World War II—“America’s Greatest Generation”—only 167,284 (just over 1%) are alive today and we’re losing 180 WWII Veterans every single day.  The origins of the American Red Cross are rooted in the wartime experiences of our beloved founder Clara Barton during our nation’s horrific Civil War.  The history of the American Red Cross is replete with heart-warming stories of the American Red Cross serving those Veterans who have served our grateful nation ever since.    

It is customary on Veterans Day (there is no apostrophe) to express our thanks and appreciation to Veterans we know or that we come across on that day.  A simple “Thank you for your service.” is wholly appropriate.  Although there is some debate on this (many Veterans don’t like to be thanked because they feel they were just doing their duty), it is my personal opinion that we should not limit our expression of gratitude for Veterans to one day a year.  Veterans past and present served and continue to serve 365 days a year (and 366 every fourth year!) so it’s fitting to thank them each and every day for their selfless service and sacrifice.  If you’re a Veteran reading this—THANK YOU for your selfless service and sacrifice!!!

Speaking of sacrifice—we also celebrate Military Family Appreciation Month in November.  Frequent moves, missed holidays, birthdays and anniversaries, and periods of long separation are all par-for-the-course for military families.  I feel I can state with a high degree of certainty that the love, encouragement, sacrifice, support and prayers provided by military families has been, and continues to be, critical to the success and welfare of our entire Veteran community. 

June 20, 2018. Washington, DC. Development SAF Stock Photography Project 2018. Photo by Roy Cox/American Red Cross

It’s appropriate we recognize our Veterans and their families in the month of November—the same month we celebrate Thanksgiving—a holiday focused on counting our blessings and expressing our genuine gratitude for our rich bounty.  Coming full circle, one of our greatest blessings is the freedom we each experience here in America.  This freedom would in no way be possible without the sacrifice of all those Veterans we honor this Friday! 

Thanks again to each and every one of you for your support of Veterans and the American Red Cross of Northern Ohio!  Best regards…Mike

Reflections of a local veteran and volunteer

Veterans Day remarks from Mike Parks follow

By Chiane Martin, American Red Cross Volunteer, Service to the Armed Forces

Veterans Day is a day, when as a country, we can sit back and reflect on the sacrifices made by the men and women of the U.S. Armed Forces. It is a day of remembrance, gratitude and honor.  As a veteran, I reflect on the personal sacrifices all veterans have made and we honor our brothers and sisters that we have lost along the way. Veterans Day is about showing homage to those who have made the ultimate sacrifice. The sacrifice of leaving everything they know and love behind to fight for their country. There is an immense sense of pride that a service member feels when they put on that uniform. That pride comes from knowing that they are fighting for something bigger than themselves.

Red Cross volunteer and US Army veteran Chiane Martin

The work that I do with the American Red Cross makes me feel that sense of pride again. I am honored to provide my fellow service members and their families with the support they need during some of the most difficult and trying times in their lives. Having someone understand the challenges you’ve faced or are facing can make all the difference and I’m grateful to be given the opportunity to do just that.

There is an immense sense of pride that a service member feels when they put on that uniform. That pride comes from knowing that they are fighting for something bigger than themselves.

Chiane Martin

The Red Cross is a phenomenal organization and were helpful when I was in the military. I respect the work and dedication that I see put in by the Red Cross and couldn’t be more happy to be a part of it. Thank you to all the men and women past and present, who have made that ultimate sacrifice. Those that understood and upheld the mission of service before self. Those that took that oath and those who understand that the world is more important than themselves.

Happy Veterans Day,

Mike Parks’ Veterans Day message

By Mike Parks, Rear Admiral, US Coast Guard (retired)
Regional CEO, American Red Cross of Northern Ohio

This Thursday, November 11th, we will remember Veterans Day, which evolved from Armistice Day and was first proclaimed in 1919 by President Woodrow Wilson.  The term “armistice” refers to when warring parties agree to stop fighting.  President Wilson’s Armistice Day recognized the end of World War One when hostilities ceased at 11 a.m. on November 11, 1918 (the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month).  The United States Congress changed Armistice Day to Veterans Day in 1954 to recognize Veterans of all U.S. wars. 

In this poster, a Tomb Guard carries out his responsibilities with
unwavering dedication, alone on the quiet plaza at dawn.
There have been Tomb Guards of all races, genders, religion
and creeds, so I wanted to keep the identity of this Tomb Guard ambiguous. 
By placing the Tomb Guard off to the side I hoped to remind the viewer
to look past the sentinel and focus on the tomb itself and the unknown
soldiers who died in service to our nation.
(Artist Matt Tavares)

This past year has been yet another year of remarkable events in our nation’s history—not the least of which was the conclusion of our military’s 20-year engagement in the war in Afghanistan—a war that saw thousands of American Veterans serve our country—many making the ultimate sacrifice or suffering debilitating injuries they will live with for the rest of their lives.  We should not only remember and thank those Veterans who served in that two-decade long war, we should also recognize and thank their families and loved ones. 

I’d like to highlight this last point just a bit more on this Veterans Day.  Veterans past and present put themselves in harm’s way to protect our way of life; many endure severe hardships while serving our country; they sacrifice significant time with their families and loved ones during long deployments-often in far-away lands and on the high seas; and they frequently uproot themselves and their families to undertake moves of entire households—many times cross-country.  All of these facets of a Veteran’s everyday life, also take a huge toll on their families and loved ones as they support their Veterans.  I speak from personal experience, and feel confident I speak for other Veterans, when I state I would not have been successful without the love, support, and prayers of my family—they were, and always will be, a true blessing.  Let us all make a special point this year to also remember to express our sincere thanks and appreciation to the families and loved ones of our Veterans.

In closing—I challenge all of us to not just remember our Veterans and their families on November 11th, but remember and thank them whenever the opportunity presents itself.  None of our Veterans only protected our freedoms one day a year—I hope we can express our gratitude on more than one day a year as well.  To all those Veterans that are reading this—“Thank you for your service!”  Please also thank your families and loved ones for their support of you and their sacrifice as well!  Let us never forget. 

Best regards…Mike

P.S. Please also take a moment to view our Virtual Resiliency Workshops website to learn how to access these resources, which are open to anyone with a military veteran affiliation (including partners, donors, service members, spouses, friends and staff members, those 18 years and up). 

The forgotten gift of service of the military child

By: Sue Wilson, American Red Cross Volunteer

When most of us think of military service, the first thing that comes to mind is the men and women in uniform who selflessly chose to serve our country. We pass them in public places, and thank them for their service. We understand that when they take the oath, they do so knowing they’ll be away from their families, work long, hard hours to complete their mission, and always, they risk injury or death. But what we don’t often think of is the sacrifice made by the children in military families, and that they, too are deserving of our appreciation.

April is the month of the Military Child, and the American Red Cross is honoring special individuals who were born into a life a service by the decision a parent made to serve our country, and the extra special ones who have used the unique challenges of their childhood to serve others in a special way.

Red Cross volunteer Zoë Day is one such person. Both her mom and dad served 20+years in the Army. Zoë is currently on the Service to Armed Forces Team for the Northeast Ohio chapter, while pursuing a Master’s Degree in Social Work.

Being a military kid is not always easy. They experience multiple moves, schools, interruptions of friendships, parental separation and always, a fear of the risk their parents service entails. Zoë has moved 7 times, and lived in places as varied as Anchorage, Alaska, San Juan, Puerto Rico, and her favorite, Fort Jackson, SC. She believes that while her many moves have presented challenges, she’s learned useful life skills. “I’ve developed a thick skin when it comes to daily stressors,” says Zoë. “Being a military brat taught me how to feel at ease in any environment and adapt, despite quick changes and challenges. I’ve learned resilience and a sense of fortitude, a ‘get the job done’ attitude.”

Zoë’s supervisor. Jessica Tischler, Regional Program Director of Service to the Armed Forces, believes it is that attitude that makes Zoë so valuable. “Zoe’s background as the child of military parents gives her a sensitivity to the needs of service men and women, veterans and their families,” she said. “We are so fortunate that she is lending her talents as a volunteer to our Service to the Armed Forces casework.”

Friendships are another unique challenge facing military kids. “I am so used to moving that it is hard to keep in contact with old friends and try to make new ones at the same time,” Zoë said. The Covid-19 pandemic hasn’t made that part any easier for the kids of military families.

Zoë said that one of the benefits of being a military kid is that her family likes to explore the state they are in and enjoy that region’s culture as much as possible. She said the virus has given everyone cabin fever, forcing us to be resourceful. This is true of other military kids, too.

“My friends, also mainly military brats, have struggled as their usual way to enjoy life is related to traveling to visit each other in new states, and continuing the tradition of seeing new places every so often. These trips are now facetime bound,” says Zoë

Zoë is currently pursuing her master’s degree in social work while she interns at the Red Cross. Did she ever consider following in her parent’s footsteps? “I thought I would, then I realized my passion lies in supporting those who have protected our country either by serving directly or by being their support system during duty. I see myself getting to know the military veteran and family population a lot better by being a boots-on-the-ground social advocate and fighting for their social-welfare.”

Zoë Day, the Red Cross salutes you, and offers a collective “Thank You” for YOUR service.”

Show your support: Since 1900, the American Red Cross has been entrusted by Federal Charter with providing care and support for our military. Your support enables us to continue this proud tradition for our military and their families. Learn more, and donate here.

Caring for our troops never gets old…even after 140 years

By Doug Bardwell, American Red Cross Volunteer

While not as high profile as conducting blood drives and setting up disaster shelters, the American Red Cross’ origin was taking care of military personnel.  Clara Barton, who founded the Red Cross, made a name for herself by her heroic volunteer efforts comforting and providing assistance to fallen soldiers during the Civil War.

Even now, as we celebrate Red Cross Month, Service to the Armed Forces is still a key pillar of the five service branches of the Red Cross. Not only do we care for the troops, but the Red Cross provides an indispensable range of services for the families of the servicepeople while deployed…and afterwards.

Worldwide Effort

The Red Cross provides 24/7/365 emergency communication services for military personnel and their families, no matter where on the globe they might be located. In addition:

The Commitment Never Ends

Since 9/11, the Red Cross has cared for more than one million military families. Today, we continue to provide support for those families before, during and after deployment. 

Besides emergency communications while deployed, military members and their families benefit from information referrals, some financial assistance, and other non-emergency resources.

“The Red Cross helps members of the military, veterans and their families in a wide variety of ways,” said Jessica Tischler, Regional Service to the Armed Forces Program Director.  “And we are continuing to provide services, thanks to our volunteer caseworkers, despite the limitations imposed by the pandemic.”

During Red Cross Month, download the free Hero Care App (for both iOS and Android) to learn more about the services available, consider helping us with this work as a volunteer, or make a contribution to the Red Cross to help with this continuing need.  

Help fulfill wish list for hospitalized veterans

Holidays for Heroes with a twist for 2020

Toothpaste, body wash and skin cream are not the most likely items for a typical holiday gift wish list.  But for those heroes who are being cared for in the VA Northeast Ohio Healthcare System, they are essentials.  And generous supporters of Northern Ohio’s hospitalized veterans can purchase these items and others on the Northern Ohio Heroes Wish List, created by the American Red Cross Northern Ohio Region.

“People are generous and always willing to help our nation’s veterans, so we’re working with our partners at the VA to make sure their patients have what they need – and want – this holiday season,” said Jessica Tischler, Regional Service to the Armed Forces Program Director. “In years past, people sent holiday cards to veterans and service men and women around the world, but this year, we are asking people to help our veterans in a different way.”

Adult coloring books and crayons are other items on the Northern Ohio Heroes Wish List, which can be accessed on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/registries/custom/7A8FY4ZJHLSM/guest-view

“We put this wish list together after consulting with the VA’s amazing health care providers,” said Tischler. “We hope that these items will help bring some comfort to men and women who can’t be home for the holidays, by letting them know Americans care about them and appreciate the sacrifices they made.”

Items purchased from the Northern Ohio Heroes Wish List will be delivered to Red Cross regional headquarters in Cleveland, and will be dropped off at facilities throughout the VA Northeast Ohio Healthcare system throughout the holiday season.

Learn more about Red Cross Service to the Armed forces here.

Veteran Air Force combat rescue officer recalls how Red Cross provided critical assistance to military families in times of need

By Brinton Lincoln, American Red Cross of Northeast Ohio Board Member and Chair, Service to the Armed Forces Committee

In the middle of 2006, deep within Afghanistan’s Nangarhar province where the great Kunar and Kabul rivers conflate, I was jostled awake by our outpost’s on-duty watch sergeant. The American Red Cross was on the phone, looking to pass an urgent message to one of my team members. His sister, just a junior in high school, had been critically injured in a car accident. Unable to contact him directly, his mother and father called upon the Red Cross and the emergency contact services that the humanitarian organization provides. Within an hour, my service mate and his family were together on the phone. No more than 24 hours later, with the financial and logistical assistance of the Red Cross, he was on his way home to be with his sister. 

Brinton Lincoln

On three occasions, including the aforementioned, I bore witness to the benefits of the emergency communication services provided by the Red Cross. In each instance, the world’s most recognized nonprofit humanitarian organization served as the interlocutor between a family in need and their loved one deployed a world away. I, and my fellow service mates, so very much appreciated the support provided by the Red Cross.

As vital as this service is, it is just one of many things that the Red Cross does to support our nation’s military members, veterans and their families. The organization provides nearly a half million services every year to our military constituency. Though not widely recognized, the Red Cross has a presence on every military installation within the U.S., on 36 bases overseas and within your local community.

Chapters across the country brief more than 787,000 service members and their families each year through the “Get to Know Us Before You Need Us” program. For the deserving military demographic, the Red Cross provides support programs within military hospitals and clinics, informational and referral services at a local level to assist veterans with unmet needs, mind-body workshops, educational programs to help military families cope with deployments, reconnection workshops, and various programs within our VA hospitals. 

Brinton Lincoln and Regional CEO Mike Parks at the annual meeting of the Greater Cleveland Board of Directors in June, 2019

The wonderful volunteers of the Red Cross work tirelessly every day to provide comfort and care to service members, veterans and their families the world over. In doing so, they embody, quite literally, the spirit of Clara Barton who, during the Civil War, founded the Red Cross to care for combat wounded soldiers.   

Should you wish to contribute your time to support the military community, contact your local Red Cross chapter and ask to speak with a representative on its Service to the Armed Forces (SAF) team. Perhaps you will be the one to assist an anxious family in their time of need by connecting them with their loved one serving in a far-off land.  

For more information on the Red Cross’ Service to the Armed Forces, visit redcross.org.

Edited by Glenda Bogar, American Red Cross volunteer
Photo credit: Jim McIntyre, American Red Cross

Mike’s Veterans Day message for 2020

By Mike Parks, Rear Admiral, US Coast Guard (Retired)
Regional CEO, American Red Cross of Northern Ohio

Greetings Northern Ohio Red Cross Family:  2020 has been a year filled with enormous challenges for our country and the American Red Cross including a devastating global pandemic, significant economic downturn, civil unrest brought about by social injustice, an unprecedented hurricane season, deadly Western wildfires, and a contentious election season.  All of these things, as well as countless others, have impacted our workforce, families, clients, donors and partners, bringing some degree of concern, anxiety and uncertainty.  One thing that has remained constant throughout this tumultuous year, has been the American Red Cross—the Red Cross you serve—has continued to meet mission each and every day!!  Thank you!!

Mike Parks

This week, despite all of the challenges, we can also gain comfort and certainty, as well as have confidence, in those men and women who have served, and are serving, in our Armed Forces to keep us safe and ensure we never lose the freedoms that have been won at such a high price.   As we all know, the American Red Cross has its roots in serving those who served in our military—our Veterans.  In honor of Veterans Day 2020, which we commemorate on Wednesday the 11th of November, I’ve included a link to a video clip that I encourage you to watch.  The clip shows the Texas Tenors singing Lee Greenwood’s “God Bless the USA.” 

I think its lyrics and the images are far more inspiring than anything I could offer in this message.  I know I felt my spirits lifted as I listened and watched it—I hope yours are as well.  In closing, please take time to reach out to a Veteran, past or present, and thank them for their service to our country—please show them by your actions that they served, or are serving, a grateful nation.  Please stay safe and well. 

Best regards…Mike

Serving country and community: Dave Riegler, U.S. Army veteran and Red Cross volunteer

A Veterans Day volunteer profile

By Tim Poe, American Red Cross volunteer

Editor’s note: Regional CEO Mike Parks’ Veterans Day message follows this profile of a volunteer and a veteran.

On Veterans Day, we honor, celebrate, and thank all who served in the United States armed forces, and we at the American Red Cross Northeast Ohio Region are especially proud and thankful for the many veterans who continue to serve our communities as Red Cross volunteers. Dave Riegler, a retired U.S. Army lieutenant colonel and volunteer based at the Summit, Portage, and Medina Counties Chapter, is one of these extraordinary individuals.

Dave RieglerDave began volunteering with the Red Cross in 2005. While recovering from a major surgery, he saw the coverage and call for volunteers after Hurricane Katrina and knew he could help.

And his help has been extraordinary. After serving at a call center in Washington, DC following Katrina, Dave has taken on a number of critical roles and responsibilities over the last 14 years. Dave estimates he has deployed about a dozen times to major disasters and regularly assists in our region. His responsibilities include logistics, warehousing, and database operations, and he often uses his skills to locate and procure needed resources.

Dave’s assistance is greatly appreciated. Rachel Telegdy, Executive Director for the Summit, Portage, and Medina Counties Chapter, stated, “Dave is the type of volunteer that will always step in to help in any way. No matter the day or time I know I can call Dave and never worry about the job getting done. His get it done attitude is commendable and his smile is contagious!”

Dave’s military and private sector accomplishments are also exceptional. He served in the U.S. Army for more than 28 years, reaching the rank of lieutenant colonel. In addition, Dave had a 40-year career at Goodyear. He began as a machinist and, after earning his engineering degree, moved to corporate engineering. He retired from both the Army and Goodyear in 1997.

Dave is also involved with a number of veterans’ and service organizations, including the Mogadore Lions Club, VFW, a retired military officers’ group, and is a 4th Degree member of the Knights of Columbus. He has a busy Veterans Day and week ahead.

During the interview, Dave’s giving nature was apparent. When asked what he most enjoys about volunteering with the Red Cross, Dave replied meeting people within the organization and helping those in need. He also mentioned that, over the years, he has given blood every time he could. Helping was the major theme in our discussion.

Dave noted how the military and the Red Cross share a commitment to training. When he deploys to a disaster, for instance, the Red Cross ensures everyone has the needed skills.

And he expressed how serving helps instill a sense of personal satisfaction, as well as providing perspective and understanding. For instance, Dave mentioned that there are things in life where we may ask why we’re even bothering. While working with the Red Cross, he sees why.

Finally, Dave said he appreciates being thanked when someone learns he is a veteran. He is sure to thank fellow veterans as well. To Dave and all veterans, on behalf of all of us in the Red Cross Northeast Ohio Region, thank you.

 

CEO’s Veterans Day message                                                                                     By Mike Parks, American Red Cross

Memorial Day Blog

Greetings to our Northeast Ohio Red Cross Family:  Today, Veterans Day, we have the privilege to honor those members of our armed forces who have faithfully served our great nation.  I use the word “privilege” intentionally because I recently had the “privilege” to attend the funeral of the last remaining World War II Coast Guard POW in Buffalo, NY when the Coast Guard and the community honored this fallen hero whose remains were finally returned home after 77 years.  LT Thomas James Eugene “Jimmy” Crotty was the youngest of five boys and a girl born to Irish immigrants in Buffalo’s old Fifth Ward in 1912.  He also was the captain of the Coast Guard Academy’s football team, president of his graduating class, and a gifted young officer who was sent to rescue passengers off the burning liner Morro Castle and later served as a special deputy on the Bering Sea Patrol.  He was a hero of Corregidor and a survivor of the Bataan Death March.  And on July 19, 1942, Crotty, was dying of diphtheria in the squalid Cabanatuan Prisoner of War Camp, soon to be given last rites at the edge of a mass grave and lost to his countrymen for 77 years.  I was humbled to be in attendance as Coast Guard paid tribute to LT Jimmy Crotty and his family for their sacrifice.  It was a sobering reminder of all those men and women who have worn the uniform of this country, serving with distinction and humility, so we can all enjoy the freedoms we so often take for granted.  The link below is a short clip of the service honoring LT Crotty.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=lt+james+crotty+pow&qpvt=lt+james+crotty+pow&view=detail&mid=BB19DF23AE7D12EB7805BB19DF23AE7D12EB7805&&FORM=VRDGAR

 A bit closer to home, our own Cleveland Cavaliers honored service members at a recent home game.  I’ve included a clip of the moving halftime ceremony featuring our Greater Cleveland Chapter board member, Nic Barlage of the Cavs, recognizing the commitment and dedication of a service members.

https://www.nba.com/cavaliers/video/teams/cavaliers/2019/11/06/2871694/1573003408385-19-20-salute-service-halftime-2871694

Within less than a week, I was privileged (there’s that word again) to observe two moving and meaningful tributes honoring members who served in our armed forces.  I remain moved and humbled by their sacrifices and by those of so many other soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen. On this Veterans Day, we all will have the opportunity and privilege, should we choose to seize upon them, to thank and honor those who have served, or are serving our nation, in uniform—please do!  To all of you reading this who have served in the armed forces—thank you for your service and for your sacrifice!  I often come across people who express their regret in having not served in the military.  I always tell them they can still serve now by supporting our military and their families in any number of ways.  November marks Military Family Appreciation Month—I would like to take a moment to thank every spouse, parent, sibling, child, and loved one who supports our men and women of the armed forces—as the above video clips confirm—families make great sacrifices as well. 

 In closing, I hope you share my sincere gratitude in serving in the world’s premier humanitarian organization that traces its roots back to supporting those on the battlefields and continues to serve our armed forces each and every day.  Stay well, stay safe, and remember to thank a veteran and their family!!  Best regards…Mike

Michael N. Parks
Rear Admiral, U.S. Coast Guard (Retired)
Chief Executive Officer
American Red Cross Northeast Ohio Region

Mike’s Veterans Day Message

By Mike Parks, Rear Admiral, U. S. Coast Guard (Retired) and CEO, American Red Cross Northeast Ohio Region

IMG_4879

Mike Parks

“On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month” in 1918 the Allies signed the armistice to end World War I.  That day, originally celebrated as Armistice Day, has evolved over the last 100 years into Veterans Day to honor the service and sacrifice of all veterans.  

This Veterans Day, as we commemorate the centennial of the end of the “war to end all wars,” (as World War I was originally known), we acknowledge it was anything but that as we also honor those brave and dedicated men and women who served in World War I, Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf,  Iraq & Afghanistan, as well as those millions of Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen who have secured our freedom during the intervening times of peace.

As we participate in parades, school assemblies, or other events honoring our veterans, please take time to reflect on those veterans that you know personally, be they family, friends, colleagues, or even acquaintances you meet in your daily activities.  Please thank them for their service—that thank you goes a long way and costs us nothing but a few seconds of our time—and it means more than you can imagine to those selfless servants. 

It’s with that gratitude in mind, I thank all of you, especially those who have worn the uniform of our country, for all you have done and continue to do to serve our nation and help support our veterans and the members of our Armed Forces.  As you know, our American Red Cross has a long and distinguished history of serving those in uniform as our genesis can be traced back to the battlefields of our Civil War.  Red Crossers have been serving men and women in the Armed Forces, and their families since our organization’s creation.  This week, we had the privilege of hosting the members of the Crossroads Division Service to the Armed Forces team here in Cleveland—just another reminder of how vitally important the American Red Cross is to the members of our military.  Thank you for recognizing and celebrating our veterans this Veterans Day!  Best regards…Mike